DAV Mid-Winter Conferences Illuminate Issues Affecting Veterans

 

Volunteering with Disabled American Veterans

Disabled American Veterans pic
Disabled American Veterans
Image: dav.org

A former analyst intern at the Marine International Petroleum Company Inc., Christopher Dabney recently completed his bachelor’s education at the University of Florida’s Warrington College of Business. Prior to starting school, Christopher Dabney spent four years serving with the USMC and he now donates every month to Disabled American Veterans.

To help it provide its wide range of opportunities, Disabled American Veterans (DAV) relies heavily on volunteers. There are three main ways volunteers can support DAV: helping at a local VA hospital, driving veterans to appointments, or helping veterans with basic tasks. Van volunteers ensure that veterans have access to VA hospitals and important treatment regardless of whether they live in a rural or urban area. Meanwhile, hospital volunteers handle such tasks as escorting patients and participating in recreational programs, and veteran assistance volunteers run errands for veterans, do yard work, or fill various other needs.

With all the help its volunteers offer, DAV is sure to show them its appreciation. Exemplary volunteer service earns volunteers recognition through DAV’s Volunteer Recognition Program, but the organization also goes beyond that. In an effort to promote youth involvement, the organization offers the Jesse Brown Memorial Youth Scholarship program. This program grants student volunteers up to $20,000 to fund their higher education, along with an expense-paid trip to DAV National Convention where they receive the award. For non-student volunteers, the organization awards the George H. Seal Memorial Trophy to honor above-and-beyond service.

DAV Helps Veterans Find Employment

Disabled American Veterans Organization pic
Disabled American Veterans Organization
Image: dav.org

Christopher Dabney, a recent recipient of a bachelors of science in finance from the University of Florida, has a wide breadth of experience. As a member of the United States Marine Corps, Christopher Dabney served in Afghanistan as a team leader. In this position he was responsible for leading and training a team of marines, ensuring that they were mentally and physically prepared for high-stress situations. In an effort to support fellow veterans, Christopher Dabney began supporting the Disabled American Veterans organization.

The Disabled American Veterans organization (DAV) strives to connect disabled veterans with the resources and services that are available to them through various government programs. Each year, it serves over one million veterans and their families, helping them to live high quality lives with respect and dignity. Connecting veterans with meaningful employment is a key service provided by the DAV.

Veterans and transitioning military service members, as well as their spouses, can utilize the employment services provided by the DAV. Each year, the DAV, in conjunction with Recruit Military and Veteran Recruiting, hosts a number nationwide career fairs that connect veterans with employers. Representatives from well-known corporations, such as Verizon, Xerox, Pep Boys, and Aetna, attend the fairs, actively looking to hire veterans. The organization also works to provide tools and resources to those looking for jobs.

Disabled American Veterans – Dedicated to Veteran and Family Support

Disabled American Veterans Organization pic
Disabled American Veterans Organization
Image: dav.org

A recent graduate of the University of Florida and former credit analyst intern with Ameris Bank, Christopher Dabney devotes time and resources to philanthropic and community oriented causes. Among these, Christopher Dabney has volunteered with Disabled American Veterans, a non-profit organization headquartered in Cold Spring, Kentucky.

Since its inception in 1920, Disabled American Veterans has aided veterans in obtaining the resources and support guaranteed them for their time in service. Professional assistance is available to both veterans and families of veterans with regard to obtaining the total amount of support and services due. This is accomplished by interfacing with the Department of Veterans Affairs as well as Congress and all levels of the legal system, from state and local governments on up.

Disabled American Veterans also reaches out to communities of veterans across the United States, forming community volunteer groups emphasizing compassion and respect. To learn more about how to volunteer, visit www.dav.org.